Google's AdWords Keyword Planner tool is another common starting point for SEO keyword research. It not only suggests keywords and provides estimated search volume, but also predicts the cost of running paid campaigns for these terms. To determine volume for a particular keyword, be sure to set the Match Type to [Exact] and look under Local Monthly Searches. Remember that these represent total searches. Depending on your ranking and click-through rate, the actual number of visitors you achieve for these keywords will usually be much lower.
Using the good ol' free Google Keyword Planner is great. But there is an alternate universe of Long Tail keyword phrases that live in Google's other database--namely, their "Autocomplete database." That's the database that is accessed when you're typing queries into the Google search box (notice that list of suggested keywords that pop up as you type?)
Be sure to re-evaluate these keywords every few months -- once a quarter is a good benchmark, but some businesses like to do it even more often than that. As you gain even more authority in the SERPs, you'll find that you can add more and more keywords to your lists to tackle as you work on maintaining your current presence, and then growing in new areas on top of that.
I think people's aresenal of keyword research tools are mostly the same: 1) You need a tool to examine search volume, most likely Google Keyword Planner 2) A tool to help you generate more keyword ideas. Tools that work with the search engines' autosuggestions are very popular such as KeywordTool.io and Ubersuggest 3) Then people might add a tool broaden the depth of their data, maybe including something like Google Trends or Moz's Keyword Difficulty tool.
2) Software project no 2 – invite your readers to participate and select 2-5 that will enter a mastermind group with you – and let the readers follow the progress – from brainstorming to hiring a coder, to beta testing, to “how to reach out to get sales” (I know you wrote a post on this – but would be great to tag along). And then those that are not part of the Mastermind group could be added to a forum/FB group and can then follow along and develop and ask each other for help.
This database was built using data from BEFORE Google required active ad accounts to get good keyword data & before they started blending data together for similar terms. Even if you set up an AdWords account and spend significant sums of money with them, they may require you to run your ad campaign for 3 or 4 months straight before they will show reasonably precise data instead of exceptionally broad data ranges.
I hope it’s easy enough for you to clearly see how pretty much any website page or blog post can be slightly modified in order to get optimized around a certain keyword. For the Busy Budgeter example – Rosemarie could easily write a brand new article – or change the title of an existing article that is already written on a similar topic, add some subheadings and a few paragraphs and have it optimized for this really low competition keyword. A keyword like this will likely bring in new visitors month after month – and Rosemarie could direct readers of that article to some of her ‘make money online’ tutorials that we already know are very profitable for her!
This keyword tool was built on a custom database we have compiled over the past four years. We researched data from the (now defunct) Google Search-Based Keyword Tool and also looked at a few more recent data snapshots to refresh the database and enhance our keyword coverage. Our database contains 28,527,279 keywords representing 13,762,942,253 monthly searches. Our database is primarily composed of English language keywords.
If you don't know the difference between head terms and long-tail keywords, let me explain. Head terms are keywords phrases that are generally shorter and more generic -- they're typically just one to three words in length, depending on who you talk to. Long-tail keywords, on the other hand, are longer keyword phrases usually containing three or more words.
As you can see, LongTailPro is pulling data from Google Adwords. WHAT?! So LTP uses a mix of their own massive data (launched in 2011) and data pulled via API from Majestic.com, Moz.com, and Google Adwords (http://adwords.google.com). Once you input your seed keywords, LongTailPro outputs suggested keywords related to your seed keywords, search volume, Adwords suggested bid, Adwords competition, total words, rank value, average keyword competition, language searched, and location searched.
Within a matter of seconds, Long Tail Pro showed me the top 25 Adwords suggestions for my seed keyword, with KC Scores already calculated! After scanning the list, I found a couple of keyword ideas that I wanted to drill further into. One of these was the keyword – legitimate work from home jobs. This keyword by itself would be very difficult to rank for (KC Score of 40) – but the new cloud version of Long Tail Pro allows me to easily grab up to 20 more suggestions based just on this keyword. I clicked the button to do that (as shown in the image below).
We prefer and suggest Long Tail Pro to all our clients. Long Tail Pro is the best long tail keyword research software online. I use their software for researching keywords for everything from social media marketing bios, to page and blog post titles, to headings (H2, H3, etc.), to meta descriptions, to YouTube descriptions, to content/articles, and so much more!
Long Tail Pro is a keyword research tool that helps you quickly find low competition keywords for your website.  In particular, the tool is built for people doing SEO (search engine optimization) as opposed to people doing paid ads (Google Adwords PPC).  I'm sure there are some advertisers that use the tool for paid ad keyword research, but the tool was built for SEO keyword research.
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