If you’re serious about making a success of blogging, you need a keyword research tool like this. Such tools can also prove useful before you even begin. If you have several ideas, you can do your research up-front, and see which niche gives you the most chance of success, and which is already highly competitive. Working this out can save you an awful lot of time and money in the long run.
I will use the tool to pull in a lot of keywords related to a theme and group them into relevant topics. These topics will either become their own content page or will be combined with other topics to create a page. KeywordTool.io is similar to other tools out there such as Uber Suggest, which I've used for a long time, but it tends to produce more keywords and it provides search volume for the keywords.
"Our whole team has a copy of Keyword Researcher, we use it for everyone of our client's keyword research for the 'Long Tail' and we use it every day to come up with blog post ideas and ideas for guest posting. We couldn't live without this tool. I have used every paid keyword research tool under the sun, and this by far is my favorite tool for mining the Long Tail."

How do I know that the KC score measures competition accurately? When I first started using the KC feature – I didn’t know for sure. But I’ve been using it since December of 2012. I’ve published literally hundreds of different articles (in different niches) around keywords with low to medium KC scores and I have a pretty good feel for the accuracy. More than 5 years of successfully ranking for low competition keywords has convinced me to completely trust the KC scores that are calculated within Long Tail Pro.
In order to know which keywords to target, it's essential to not only understand the demand for a given term or phrase, but also the work required to achieve high rankings. If big brands take the top 10 results and you're just starting out on the web, the uphill battle for rankings can take years of effort. This is why it's essential to understand keyword difficulty.
But maybe you didn’t watch the tutorial video yet. Or maybe you didn’t know about the extremely powerful KC feature. Maybe you didn’t know how quickly, easily and effectively you could analyze Google top 10 search results with Long Tail Pro. And maybe you didn’t even know how profitable it can be to simply target just the really long tail keywords.
So what exactly is Keyword Competitiveness (KC)? It’s only the feature within Long Tail Pro that completely changed the game and made keyword research so ridiculously simple that even a dumb truck driver like me could become an expert! It basically works like this. As soon as you click the button in Long Tail Pro Cloud to retrieve keywords, it automatically calculates a number for each keyword (between 1 and 100) based on several different SEO factors. Lower numbers mean the keyword is easier to rank for and higher means it is harder to rank for. More on that below…
This keyword tool was built on a custom database we have compiled over the past four years. We researched data from the (now defunct) Google Search-Based Keyword Tool and also looked at a few more recent data snapshots to refresh the database and enhance our keyword coverage. Our database contains 28,527,279 keywords representing 13,762,942,253 monthly searches. Our database is primarily composed of English language keywords.
Analyze Keyword Difficulty – Targeting difficult keywords with the highest competition is not always the best idea. The SEMrush Keyword Difficulty tool helps you determine keywords’ difficulties. By indicating a particular keyword’s percentage of difficulty, this tool helps you estimate how easy it would be to seize your competitors’ organic positions in the SERPs.
You don’t really need to worry about the volume size either. Too big a number just means you will have to work harder to get ranked in Google. It’s now quite commonplace to see SEO people say it’s best to just go with your gut feeling on a keyword. Just go for something you would type into Google search yourself instead of beating yourself up trying to find that ‘one’ killer keyword.
I hope it’s easy enough for you to clearly see how pretty much any website page or blog post can be slightly modified in order to get optimized around a certain keyword. For the Busy Budgeter example – Rosemarie could easily write a brand new article – or change the title of an existing article that is already written on a similar topic, add some subheadings and a few paragraphs and have it optimized for this really low competition keyword. A keyword like this will likely bring in new visitors month after month – and Rosemarie could direct readers of that article to some of her ‘make money online’ tutorials that we already know are very profitable for her!
This is slightly more complicated than it used to be, because you have to actually create a live AdWords Campaign as part of the process! This puts many people off, as it looks as if you have to actually advertise in order to use the tool. You don’t — you can just setup the campaign and then pause it before it runs so you don’t have to spend a penny.

Ever since Google announced the impending demise of the AdWords Keyword Tool and their preference for its new avatar – the Keyword Planner, yet another hot discussion has sprung up in the SEO community. This time, strong adherents of the free-for-all ideology are riled at Google’s decision to make the Keyword Planner accessible only to marketers who’ve explicitly signed up to Google’s AdWords (which is one step more than having a Gmail account), taking it closer to being a paid tool in future! I don’t see this as a hindrance, because most other keyword (or other) tools require you to create an account and sign in before you can use them, even if they’re free. But if Google does it, we have reason to pounce on them, don’t we?

A very popular and highly competitive keyword on Google search engine is "making money." It has 85,300,000 search results, meaning that millions of websites are relevant or competing for that keyword. Keyword research starts with finding all possible word combinations that are relevant to the "making money" keyword. For example, a keyword "acquiring money" has significantly fewer search results, only 61 000 000, but it has the same meaning as "making money." Another way is to be more specific about a keyword by adding additional filters. Keyword "making money online from home in Canada" is less competitive on a global scale and therefore easier to rank for. Furthermore, keywords also have various intents which can affect whether the marketer would want to target that keyword. Multiple tools are available (both free and commercial) to find keywords and analyze them.
1. AdWords Keyword Planner - It's still the standard, although Google keeps making changes that just aren't helpful. I get that they want us to treat closely-related keywords in such a way that we're not creating multiple pages when we should just have one, but I'd appreciate it if they'd still break down the volume for each keyword that makes up a group (or at least list the keywords they're clumping together into a group).
If you already create niche websites, you can clearly see how everything I’ve discussed above will benefit you. In fact, you probably already understood all of it. But maybe you are a blogger who has never thought of creating a niche website. Is this you? Let me tell you – if you can create a blog, you can create a niche website. It is not hard at all to create a small site, laser focused on a very specific topic, that will earn at least enough to make Long Tail Pro pay for itself.
I also want to emphasize that Microsoft Excel and Google Docs perhaps play an equal, if not more important role in keyword research than any of these tools, because at the end of the day, the mountain of data you end up with is of no use if you can’t perform calculations, sort, filter, present or store it in a way that’s best suits the task at hand. Head over to Distilled for a comprehensive Excel for SEOs guide. Alternatively, bug this guy—he’s the Sensei who trains Excel ninjas in the dark of the night.
"I've been doing keyword research for years, and I can tell you that dealing with hundreds of keywords and dozens of spreadsheets is enough to make anyone lose the will to live. Keyword Researcher is great because not only does it let you easily find keywords that people are actually searching for, but it has a clean and simple interface that makes it easy to keep track of what you've found. If I'm stuck and need some new ideas, I just fire it up and usually find several things to write about in a few minutes."
The cost is only a one time payment…no monthly fees, which is fantastic if you’re on a budget, and you get lifetime updates and some truly excellent training videos as well as some very useful built-in tools. I’ve also tried other paid keyword tools such as Market Samurai, Wordtracker, Jaaxy, and others, and let me tell you this….none of them come close to Keyword Researcher Pro for value and ease of use.

To be able to rank in the search engines is an art that must be understood and finding the right Keyword tool that fits into your comfort zone is a must. What I mean by ‘comfort zone’ is having a keyword tool that doesn’t confuse you before you begin even searching. Some go into far too much detail than is necessary. All you need really are good long tail ‘common sense’ keywords that other marketers may have missed.
Ever since Google announced the impending demise of the AdWords Keyword Tool and their preference for its new avatar – the Keyword Planner, yet another hot discussion has sprung up in the SEO community. This time, strong adherents of the free-for-all ideology are riled at Google’s decision to make the Keyword Planner accessible only to marketers who’ve explicitly signed up to Google’s AdWords (which is one step more than having a Gmail account), taking it closer to being a paid tool in future! I don’t see this as a hindrance, because most other keyword (or other) tools require you to create an account and sign in before you can use them, even if they’re free. But if Google does it, we have reason to pounce on them, don’t we?

3) Google: This is pretty straight forward but it’s the main reason I like it. I search for my main seed keyword in Google, and use the keywords that Google itself highlights in bold on the search results, plus the “Searches related to” section at the bottom to get keyword variations or LSI. That’s basically what Google is telling you that topic is about. No need for a thousands other tools. I use these to optimize the on page of my target pages as well.


The SEO market has been recording a lot of advancements in the recent past. The world has thousands of keyword research tools and it’s hard for you to grasp all of them. Some of them come free of charge while others have to be paid. There are so many free keyword tools that generate excellent results in the various search engines. This article eases your work by presenting top ten free keyword research tools you can find in the market. You can use any of them depending on your SEO needs and nature of industry.
The limit on manual keywords could be higher.  I personally wish we could input 10,000 keywords at a time, instead of 200.  However, I understand the costs that Long Tail Pro has to maintain each time a new manual keyword is input.  Not a deal breaker, I just wish the limit was higher. (To be fair, I don't think most keyword tools have a bulk manual option at all).
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